Thursday, October 11, 2012

Travel New Zeeland

Queenstown and Lake Wakatipu: A Scenic Getaway


Queenstown, in New Zealand, is renowned for the beauty of its scenery.  LakeWakatipu remains the most celebrated natural attraction in the area.
Top 10 Sights to See in New Zealand

The lightning bolt-shaped finger lake, a gorgeous sight on its own, is further enhanced by the Remarkables’ Mountains which surround it, creating a scene of utter majesty for all who come to see and explore. It’s a haven for nature-lovers and outdoorsy types, but those who enjoy more luxurious comforts will feel right at home as well, as the area has been built up with some particularly lovely accommodations that provide stunning views. Tired of looking at concrete and steel? Come spend a weekend in Queenstown at Lake Wakatipu for a breathtakingly scenic getaway.

Rooms for Every Budget


If your end is high-end, you’re in luck in Queenstown. Azur is lodged high above the lake for dramatic views of the city, the Remarkables and Cecil Peak. It is made up of nine private and exclusive villas, each outfitted with thoroughly modern extras, like a complimentary minibar, LCD screen TVs and a deluxe stereo system; there’s even an in-room massage service for the tension in your back and neck. Yet the private terrace will no doubt become your favorite spot for a morning coffee, as you breathe in the clear mountain air and take in the dazzling sites.

The Blue Peaks Lodge is a more moderately priced hotel that’s well-suited for families and centrally located so that the center of Queenstown is just a five minute walk. The picturesque mountain range is visible from most rooms, while the motel itself is designed to mimic their geographical shape and color. Rooms are clean, attractive and come with TV and DVD player as well as high speed Wi-Fi.

For a frugal stay, book a bed in the Nomads’ Queenstown hostel, a well-located and convenient dorm-style spot that’s just a hop, skip and a jump to the mountains or the lake. Skiing fanatics will appreciate the storage space, while guests of all kinds will enjoy relaxing in the cinema, whipping up something in the shared kitchen or surfing the internet with free Wi-Fi. Dorm space can run as low as $20 per night, while private rooms are a reasonable $34.

Paraflight


What could be a more all-encompassing way to see Lake Wakatipu than from above? You don’t need to charter a helicopter, just sign up for a paraflight adventure, either solo or with a friend or two, and soar above the glittering the lake while connected to a boat that’s skimming along on the water. 

You will rise some 600 feet in the air and take in spectacular sights otherwise denied to all but the birds. It’s an experience that is suitable for most people over the age of 12, with a comfortable harness and smooth take-offs and landings.

T.S.S. Earnslaw


A refined and fascinating way to take in the lake is aboard the T.S.S. Earnslaw, a steamship which transports guests along the lake and back in time, with its early 20th century-style fireboxes and boilers. The Earnslaw, also known as the “Lady of the Lake,” is practically a floating institution, as it has been steaming along since 1912, originally used to carry livestock. 

This October marks its centennial anniversary and there are special cruises and parties planned for the celebration. Dining for brunch, lunch and dinner are combined with tours of the ship, as well as, ample opportunity to simply stand on-deck and marvel at the surroundings.
Kayaking


Kayaking is a much more personal way to feel close to the water while also feeling truly awed by the rising mountains from the ground-level. Most kayaking trips are quite easy and suitable for beginners, while some are also suited for fishing from the ample stocks of brown trout, rainbow trout and Chinook salmon. 

Queenstown Underwater Observatory



Perhaps you can’t swim and getting into a boat is a terrifying prospect. You can still enjoy Lake Wakapitu from below in the Observatory, where the water, fish and eels stay behind glass and a life jacket is not necessary. Kids will “ooh” and “ahh” as freshwater eels slither easily through the lake and the scaup – diving ducks – gracefully plunge underwater in search of their next meal.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Happy Birthday Google

Happy Birthday Google's 14th Birthday




Monday, September 17, 2012

Travel Best Places In Mumbai , India Part 3 of 4

Travel Best Places In Mumbai , India

Part 3 of 4


Things To Do In Mumbai
Camping In Mumbai
There are many spots near mumbai in which you can go for camping. Camping can be done safely on spots such as Lonavala, Tungarli Lake, Valvan Lake, Rajmachi, Mahableshwar, Panchgani, Kashid & Phansad. You can try out letscampout.com  for more options on camping near Mumbai. Rusticville  offers excellent hill top camping at Tikona near Lonavala.

And Many More
There is a lot to do in Mumbai, but lack of space means that for outdoorsy activities, you need to head north, often outside city limits. In the Northwestern suburbs and Thane, you will find opportunities for water sports like H20 at Girgaum Chowpatty. There are two golf courses in the city, the more famous one in Chembur in the Harbour suburbs.

Mumbai has a vibrant theater scene with plays in many languages including English, Hindi, Gujarati, and Marathi. While South Mumbai has frequent performances, the best organized theater effort is at Prithvi theater, Juhu in the Western Suburbs. There are plenty of opportunities to enjoy Indian classical music and dance. While not a patch on the Sabhas of Chennai, you will find frequent performances of Carnatic music in Shanmukhananda Hall, Matunga in the South Central suburbs.
Mumbai is also usually the first stop for Western pop and rock stars visiting India, which they usually do when they are over 50. The Rock scene is very good in Mumbai. These are very safe to go to and are recommended for rock fans. Most bands cover heavy metal acts like Pantera, Six feet under, and Slipknot, but at places like 'Not just jazz by the bay', there are treats for Jazz fans, as well. To try to find places with specific music tastes try asking students outside Mumbai's colleges. Western classical music performances are rarer. However most classical music performances along with other art forms are regularly performed at NCPA  and Tata Theatre, both situated next to the the narrow strip at Nariman Point.
§  Experience Bollywood; plan a trip Film City located in Goregaon and enjoy the first hand experience of Bollywood shooting
§  Watch a Movie; you are in the land of Bollywood. Expect whistles and clapping by crowd in admiration of their celebrities on the screen. Most of the cinema halls run both 'popular and new' Bollywood as well as Hollywood movies and some even screen ones in regional languages. Some of the popular Hollywood screening cinema halls in South Mumbai are Eros opposite Churchgate, Metro on M.G.Road, Regal in Colaba, Sterling next to CST Station, and New Excelsior in Fort. Checkout newspaper listing to get the list of latest screenings.
§  Visit Essel World

§  Take A Dip at Water World
§  Visit museums and art galleries
§  Pub Hopping, The number and variety of Pubs in the city allow for an enthralling Pub Hopping opportunity.
§  Borivili National Park, or go for Flamingo watching in Chembur (check with Bombay Natural History Society for further info).
§  Watch Cricket for Free; cricket is has a national games stature in India, and Mumbaiites revere that every day of the year. Azad Maidan (Azad ground) near C.S.T. Railway station, ground opposite to Ruia College in Matunga and Shivaji Park in Dadar west are some of the best places to witness the cricket fever for free. Look out and you may be even lucky to witness ongoing game of cricket on some of the empty streets of Mumbai.
Marine Drive
§  Temples; there are so many religious places around in the city (both old and new) that one can plan a day long itinerary on that. Start with Mahalkshmi Temple, Banganga Temple, Siddhi Vinayak, Afghan Church, Mahim Church, Haji Ali... the list will get really long.
§  Cruise on a Harbour Cruise; cruises from Gateway of India leave every 30 min daily except during the monsoon season (Jun-Sep). Rs 40.
§  Join for Heritage walks ; organized by two architects, these walks take you around various historic and architecturally significant areas of the city. Walks are organized on the third Sunday of every month (with a break from June through August for the monsoons) and the route varies each time. The walks last around 90 min. Rs 100 (Discounted rates for students and the physically challenged).
§  Walk along Marine Drive; also known as Queen's Necklace, this beachside promenade is worth a ride. A walk can be planned from Girgaon Chowpati (Girgaon beach) all the way upto Nariman Point. Be carefull and avoid this area during heavy rains.
§  Take a morning walk on Juhu beach
§  Celebrate at the Kala Ghoda Festival . The arts and crafts festival is held in the last week of Jan or first week of Feb annually in the historic precinct of Kala ghoda in Mumbai.
§  Taj private yacht; if you can afford it (at $300/hr, including drinks & meals), rent the Taj's private yacht (has two sun decks and three bedrooms) for a cruise around the Mumbai harbour.
§  Poonawallas Breeders Multimillion; on the last Sunday of February, the glitterati of Mumbai dress up for the Ascot of Mumbai at the Mahalaxmi Race Course. With High Tea, amazing hats, and hundreds of ordinary punters staking their little all on the outside chance, this is the event to attend in Mumbai so try to cage a ticket if you happen to visit around then.
§  Enjoy theatre & performances; Mumbai offers unlimited opportunities to theatre lovers and there are regular shows across theatres in the city. Check newspapers on latest shows as well as performances at prominent halls such as Prithvi Theatre, NCPA, Tata Theatre.
§  Get crowded, and try catching suburban trains at peak times. You are warned though.
§  Chowpati Jayenge Bhel Puri Khayenge; as it says in the lyrics of one of the Bollywood movie song, go to beaches (specially in the evenings) and enjoy local favourite 'Bhel Puri' while the sun sets in the Arabic sea.





Sunday, September 16, 2012

Travel Best Places In Mumbai , India Part 2 of 4

Travel Best Places In Mumbai 

Part 2 of 4



South Mumbai (Fort, Colaba, Malabar Hill, Nariman Point, Marine Lines, Tardeo)
The oldest areas of Mumbai. Contains Mumbai's downtown area and is considered the heart of this commercial capital of India. The richest neighborhoods in the country are located here, which command among the highest property rates in the world. Real estate prices in South Mumbai are comparable to those in Manhattan. This is the primary tourist area of Mumbai and home to most of Mumbai's museums, art galleries, bars, upscale restaurants, and the Gateway of India.


Gateway Of India

Nariman Point



South Central Mumbai (Byculla, Parel, Worli, Prabhadevi, Dadar)
Used to be Mumbai's industrial heartland, but went into decline when the industries did. Now this area has been revamped into a white-collar office location. Home to Mumbai's only zoo, the Worli sea face, and the temple to what people consider the city's guardian deity. As you move north, it morphs into a nice middle-class locality.


North Central Mumbai
 (Dharavi, Matunga, Vadala, Sion, Mahim)
Primarily an upper middle-class area, except for Dharavi, which contains Asia's second largest slum. This area developed immediately after India's independence, because of a wave of immigration. Part of the migrants were refugees from the partition.


West Mumbai (Bandra, Khar, Santa Cruz, Juhu, Vile Parle, Andheri,Versova)
Contains Mumbai's other downtown and is home to those rich who want to have a more peaceful surrounding. It has few beaches. Home to a large Christian community and the city's most famous church. This is also where the city's domestic and international airports are.







East Mumbai
 (Kurla, Vidyavihar, Ghatkopar, Vikhroli, Kanjur Marg, Bhandup, Mulund, Powai,Thane)
This is a solidly middle class bastion. Mulund and Ghatkopar are home to predominantly middle and upper middle class populace, many from the entrepreneurial Gujarati community.


Harbour Suburbs
 (Chembur, Mankhurd, Govandi, Trombay)
Before the development of Navi Mumbai as a satellite town of Bombay, this area used to be known only for the existence of an atomic research centre. Now this is known for being on the way to Navi Mumbai.


North Mumbai
 (Manori, Jogeshwari, Borivali, Gorai, Mira Road, Bhyander, Naigaon, Vasai, Nala Sopara, Virar)
This is where you go to find beaches that are not dirty. Other than this, it is just another victim of Bombay's vast urban sprawl. Contains the Sanjay Gandhi National Park and Mumbai's oldest heritage sites: the Kanheri, Mahakali, Jogeshwari, and Mandapeshwar rock-cut temples dating from the 1st century B.C to the 5th century A.D. The Global Vipassana Pagoda is a notable monument in Gorai, Mumbai, India. The pagoda is to serve as a monument of peace and harmony. This monument was inaugurated by Pratibha Patil, the President of India on 8 February 2009. It is located in the north of Mumbai in an area called Gorai and is built on donated land on a peninsula between Gorai creek and the Arabian Sea. Essel world, India's largest amusement park is also located on the gorai island, just besides the global vipassana pagoda.






Colonial buildings

The British built a magnificent city within the walls of Fort St. George, which lies at the southern extremity of the city. Some fine examples of the Gothic revival, Neo-classical style and Indo-Saracenic style are seen within this area. To get the best [South Mumbai] experience, stroll around the wide streets of the area right from Churchgate to Colaba. These areas are all beautifully planned and have wide and clean pavements unlike the rest of the city. Famous monuments to be seen in this area are the Gateway of India, the Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (Victoria Terminus) building, the Municipal Corporation and Police Headquarters and the Chhatrapati Shivaji Vastu Sanghralaya (formerly, the Prince Of Wales museum). The famous Taj Mahal hotel is located just opposite the Gateway of India. The Mumbai University buildings and the High Court are also excellent examples of colonial architecture in the city.
There are a lot of other modern structures to look at in this area. The area known as Marine Drive (right from Chowpatty beach to NCPA) is home to a large number of buildings built in the Art Deco style. Mumbai is second only to Miami in the number of Art Deco buildings. some famous buildings in this style are the Eros and Regal cinemas.

Museums and galleries


Nehru Centre
Some of the most famous museums and art galleries in India are found here. The Kala Ghoda area in South Mumbai teems with them, particularly the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (Prince of Wales Museum) and the National Gallery of Modern Art. Once again, most of them are concentrated in South Mumbai. Also worth planning a visit is Jehangir Art Gallery, also at Kala Ghoda, displays changing exhibits by notable artists. The plaza next to the gallery also regularly displays exhibits of various artists.
Situated in Nehru Complex in Worli is Nehru Centre Art Gallery at Worli, a gallery dedicated to young and promising talent along with established artists. Also within the complex is located a permanent exposition, Discovery of India, which attempts to cover every aspect of artistic, intellectual and philosophical attainment of India through ages. The exposition spreads across 14 galleries and reflects true identity of the country. On the other end of the complex, Nehru Science Centre - which has a separate entrance from Mahalaxmi race course road, has a permanent exhibition on 'interactive and exciting' science related exhibits highlighting science principles in fun yet educational way.

Beaches

Mumbai has a few beaches, including one in the downtown area. But they aren't that great and the water off Mumbai's coast is extraordinarily dirty. The relatively better ones are in the Northwest Mumbai area. However, they are a great place to see how the locals spend their Sunday evenings, with various food and game stalls.
There are other beaches to be found such as the Girgaon Chowpaty in South Mumbai, Juhu beach in the western suburbs and Aksa Beach in Malad. The currents don't seem strong, but particularly in the rains, lots of people die from drowning, so avoid getting in the water (especially at Aksa Beach). A word of advice to women: Bombay beaches are not the kind you can wear swimsuits to, particularly two-pieces.


Chowpatty beach


Zoos, parks and gardens

Mumbai has a justified reputation as a concrete jungle, but there are some nice pockets of greenery within the city. It is also one of the rare metropolises to have an entire national park within its borders. (Borivali national park also known as Sanjay Gandhi National Park). You will not visit Mumbai for them, but if you are already here, they make a nice escape from the din and bustle. It also houses the ancient Kanheri Caves crafted out of rocky cliffs, which dates back to 2,400 years. Entrance fee: Indians/Foreigns 30/30
The city zoo (Veermata Jijabai Udyan) is in Byculla and is a colonial relic which is surprisingly well-preserved. The animals may look rather emaciated, but the sheer diversity of trees on this lush zoo is worth a trip.
Some city parks are very well-maintained and combine history as well. The "Hanging Gardens" on Malabar Hill offers stunning vistas of the Marine Drive. Opposite the Hanging Gardens, there is another park which is known as Kamla Nehru Park, famous for the striking shoe-shaped structure which has been filmed in variuos Bollywood movies
Further in South Mumbai, the Mumbai Port Trust Garden, is another hidden gem. This is set off a small side street off the Colaba Causeway 2-3 kms south of the main section. Once again, lovely views of the port, the naval yards, and sunset.
In central Mumbai, there are the Five Gardens. Mainly used by walkers in the morning, it is a mess in the evenings. But the gardens encircle some historic, art deco residences.


Markets and crowds

Mumbai is probably worth visiting just for its street markets, the hustle of vendors, and the madness of the crowds.


Modern buildings and malls

Once the British left, the zeal to wipe away the traces of colonial rule was, unfortunately, not matched by the enthusiasm to build a new city that matched the grandeur of the British-era buildings. Now, while the shabbiness of the socialist era is thankfully being replaced by architecture with an eye on aesthetics, the new malls, multiplexes, and office buildings that are coming up are indistinguishable from those anywhere else in the world. Still, they are worth a look, especially if you want to have a look at India's success story. Skyscrapers exceeding 60 stories now dominate the skyline.
For long, Inorbit Mall was the only mall offering a lot of variety for shoppers. Palladium, built within the High Street Phoenix, broke the monopoly of Inorbit Mall. From state of the art interiors to international brands, the Palladium has everything. Nirmal Lifestyles Mall in Mulund and Metro Junction Mall in Kalyan are two of the largest malls in Mumbai. Located in the central suburbs, they are quite popular in the city.
Powai is a modern central mumbai suburb with European looks. Powai houses the Indian Institute of Technology and is built around fabulous lake. Most of the construction is in a township format and is privately built. It houses twenty top of the line restaurants, two large convenience stores, a handful of coffee shops and entertainment areas. Initially built as an upmarket self contained township, Powai has now grown into a business process outsourcing hub in Mumbai. The township reflects both characteristics; you will often find families shopping and twenty somethings hanging out in tables next to each other.

Religious places


Mumbai has temples, mosques, churches, Parsi agiaries, and even a few synagogues reflecting the diversity of its citizens. While these are naturally of interest if you are a believer, some, like the Portuguese church at Dadar are worth visiting just for their unique architecture.
Haji Ali Dargah is one of the most visited places in Mumbai. The Dargah Sharief is built on a tiny islet located 500 meters from the coast, in the middle of Worli Bay, in the vicinity of Worli. People from different religion and places visit this places. More than 80,000 people visit dargah every week.
One notable monument in the northwest suburbs of Mumbai is the Global Vipassana Pagoda (Global Pagoda), Gorai, Mumbai. It is a mediatation centre that can seat 8000 people. Vipassana literally means meditaion, and the centre runs 10-day meditation courses and 1 day mega couses on Sundays. The courses are free of cost but you would have to register for them in advance on their website.
Siddhivinayak temple of Mumbai is very famous. It is located in Dadar and you can easily get a taxi to go to the temple from the Dadar railway station.
The city also boasts of Jewish places of worship predominantly in the area called Byculla.In this area the three prominent sub castes amongst inhabiting Jews of Mumbai lived .They were Bagdadi Jews,Bene Israelis and the locals who had conveted over a period of time and lived in the hinterland.





Travel Best Places In Mumbai , India Part 1 of 4

Travel Best Places In Mumbai ,India

Part 1 of 4


Mumbai (Marathi: मुंबई)  a cosmopolitan metropolis, earlier known as Bombay, is the largest city in India and the capital of Maharashtra state. Mumbai was originally a conglomeration of seven islands on the Konkan coastline which over time were joined to form the island city of Bombay. The island was in turn joined with the neighbouring island of Salsette to form Greater Bombay. The city is one of the world's most populous cities.
Mumbai is undoubtedly the commercial capital of India and is one of the predominant port cities in the country. Mumbai's nature as the most eclectic and cosmopolitan Indian city is symbolized in the presence of Bollywood within the city, the centre of the globally-influential Hindi film and TV industries. It is also home to India's largest slum population.



Mumbai is a bustling, diverse metropolis with a flare all its own. The entrepreneurial spirit and pulsing pace of life provide a sharp contrast to much of the rest of India.

Name

There has been much debate regarding the original name of the city. Some say the current name of the city Mumbai is the original name; and is an eponym derived from "Mumba", the name of the local Hindu goddess Mumbadevi, and "Aai", meaning "mother" in Marathi. Others claim Bombay was an anglicized version of Bom Bahia, a name given by the Portuguese to mean "Beautiful Bay" and later made popular by the British as the name of the Bombay state.
The name was officially changed from Bombay to Mumbai in 1995. Although Bombay and Mumbai are both used, people who explicitly use "Bombay" are generally non-Marathi speakers whereas "Mumbai" proponents primarily speak Marathi. In the West, Mumbai has become more commonly accepted in order to avoid controversy. It is also fondly called as आमची मुंबई ("our Mumbai").

History


Though the seven islands that now make up the city have a long recorded history like any other place in India, their journey to form the city of Mumbai really started in 1498, when the Portuguese took them over from the Sultan of Gujarat. They built a settlement, forts, and churches, (including the strange looking Portuguese Church that stands to this day.) They, however, could not make much of their possession and the seven islands were handed over to England in 1661 as part of the dowry of Catherine de Braganza when she married Charles II of England. He wasn't very interested in the islands either, and he leased them to the British East India Company for £10 a year in 1668. The East India Company built the docks, the trading posts, and the fort that would form the nerve centre of the city. They also started off the long process of reclaiming land and joining the islands, an activity which went on until the 1960s.
The port attracted industries and the entrepreneurial communities like the Parsis, Gujaratis, and Marwaris (from Rajasthan) migrated and set up trading companies and factories in the late 19th century. Industries attracted migrant labor from different parts of the country. The successive waves of migration shaped the character of the city and its neighborhoods.
The city that owes its existence to the efforts of the British was also the birthplace of the Indian National Congress, which played an overwhelmingly important role in the independence movement. The city whose mills were built by industrialists from across the country is the capital of Maharashtra state, which was carved on linguistic lines for Marathi speakers.
In the 80s, high labour costs and unrest forced the closure of many textile mills and the city went into a decline from which it started recovering only in the late 90s. The high population put a strain on the infrastructure. The rail and road network has been undergoing a steady improvement over the 90s, but because of the magnitude of the task, the roads seem to be perennially under construction. Mumbai has now reinvented itself as a hub for the Service industry.
In January 1993, in the wake of the destruction of the Babri Mosque in Ayodhya, a wave of riots swept the city, with over 1000 people killed, the vast majority of whom were Muslims. Relations between the city's various ethnic groups have been tense ever since, with several terrorist outrages  adding fuel to the fire.

Culture and attitudes
Mumbai is the most cosmopolitan city in India. In comparison with the rest of the country, the city is quite liberal. With a regular influx of immigrants from rest of India, the citizens, popularly known as 'Mumbaikers', have shown remarkable tolerance towards other cultures, making it a true cultural melting pot. However in recent times, this tolerance has sometimes bowed under external pressures. Between the 60s and 80s, there was resentment about the non-Marathi speakers taking away jobs. The 1991 and 1993 riots between Hindus and Muslims did attempt to affect this spirit, however the city managed to recover from these, once again proudly highlighting true 'spirit of Mumbai'.


Climate

Mumbai has three main seasons — Summer, Monsoon, and Winter (milder summer). The best time to visit is during the winter between November and February. Humidity is also less during the winter, when the climate is pleasant; the minimum temperature is 17 degrees centigrade and the maximum is 30-31 degrees. Summer is from March to May with highs in the low to mid 30s (roughly 80-90°F). It is hot and humid during this time. June to September is the monsoon season when the city is lashed by heavy rains. The city gets flooded two or three times and normal life gets disrupted during this season. Climate is humid pretty much throughout the year because the city rests on 






Friday, September 14, 2012

Australia : Aerial of Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, Queensland

Travel Australia :
Aerial of Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, Queensland



Heron Island is a coral cay located near the Tropic of Capricorn in the southern Great Barrier Reef, 72 km north-east of Gladstone, Queensland, Australia, and 539 km north of the state capital Brisbane. The island is situated on the leeward (western) side of Heron Reef, a fringing platform reef of significant biodiversity, supporting around 900 of the 1,500 fish species and 72% of the coral species found on the Great Barrier Reef.
The island is about 800 metres (2,600 feet) long and 300 metres (980 feet) at its widest, giving an area of approximately 16 hectares (40 acres). The highest point, near the western tip, is 3.6 metres (12 feet) ASL. A dune ridge along the southern shore rises some 3 metres (9.8 feet) ASL, lower dunes on the northeastern side are only about one metre (3 ft) above the sea.
Heron Island and an extrapolated version of the research station are the scene of much of the first part of Arthur C. Clarke's The Deep Range


Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Member States of the United Nations : With Website and Contact Details Part 2

Member States of the United Nations : With Website and Contact Details Part 2


N

Namibia23-04-1990
www.un.int/namibia/
360 Lexington Avenue, Suite 1502, New York, NY 10017
(212) 685-2003

Nauru14-09-1999
www.un.int/nauru/
800 Second Avenue, Suite 400A, New York, NY 10017
(212) 937-0074

Nepal14-12-1955
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/nepal/
820 Second Avenue, Suite 17B, New York, NY 10017
(212) 370-3988/3989

Netherlands10-12-1945
www.netherlandsmission.org/homepage.asp
235 East 45th Street, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 519-9500

New Zealand24-10-1945
www.nzembassy.com/home.cfm?...
One United Nations Plaza, 25th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 826-1960

Nicaragua24-10-1945
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/nicaragua/
820 Second Avenue, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 490-7997

Niger20-09-1960
www.un.int/niger/
417 East 50th Street, New York, NY 10022
(212) 421-3260/3261/3286

Nigeria07-10-1960
www.un.int/nigeria/
828 Second Avenue, New York, NY 10017
(212) 953-9130

Norway27-11-1945
www.norway-un.org/
825 Third Avenue, 38th Floor, New York, NY 10022
(212) 421-0280

O

Oman07-10-1971
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/oman
305 East 47th Street, 12th Floor New York, N.Y. 10017
(212) 355-3505

P

Pakistan30-09-1947
www.pakun.org/
Pakistan House, 8 East 65th Street, New York, NY 10021
(212) 879-8600

Palau15-12-1994
Panama13-11-1945
www.panama-un.org/
866 United Nations Plaza, Suite 4030, New York, NY 10017
(212) 421-5420/5421, 759-1779

Papua New Guinea10-10-1975
N/A
201 East 42nd Street, Suite 405, New York, NY 10017
(212) 557-5001

Paraguay24-10-1945
www.un.int/paraguay/
211 East 43rd Street, Suite 400, New York, NY 10017
(212) 687-3490/3491

Peru31-10-1945
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/peru
820 Second Avenue, Suite 1600, New York, NY 10017
(212) 687-3336, (212) 277-8467 (Press Matters)

Philippines24-10-1945
www.un.int/philippines/
556 Fifth Avenue, 5th floor, New York, NY 10036
(212) 764-1300

Poland24-10-1945
www.un.polemb.net
750 Third Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017
(212) 744 2506

Portugal14-12-1955
www.missionofportugal.org/pmop/
866 Second Avenue, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 759-9444/9445/9446/9447

Q

Qatar21-09-1971
www.qatarmission.org/
809 United Nations Plaza, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 486-9335/9336

R

Republic of Korea17-09-1991
http://un.mofat.go.kr
335 East 45th Street, New York, NY 10017
(212) 439-4000

Republic of Moldova02-03-1992
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/moldova
35 East 29th Street, New York, NY 10016
(212) 447-1867

Romania14-12-1955
mpnewyork.mae.ro/
573-577 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10016
(212) 682-3273/3274, 818-1491/1496, (212) 972-3230 (Ambassador’s Office)

Russian Federation*24-10-1945
www.un.int/russia/new/MainRootrus/index_plain.html
136 East 67th Street, New York, NY 10065
(212) 861-4900/4901

*The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics was an original Member of the United Nations from 24 October 1945.
In a letter dated 24 December 1991, Boris Yeltsin, the President of the Russian Federation, informed the Secretary-General that the membership of the Soviet Union in the Security Council and all other United Nations organs was being continued by the Russian Federation with the support of the 11 member countries of the Commonwealth of Independent States.
Rwanda18-09-1962
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/rwanda/
124 East 39th Street, New York, NY 10016
(212) 679-9010/9023/9024

S

Saint Kitts and Nevis23-09-1983
www.stkittsnevis.org/
414 East 75th Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10021
(212) 535-1234

Saint Lucia18-09-1979
www.un.int/stlucia/
800 Second Avenue, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 697-9360/9361

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines16-09-1980
www.svg-un.org/
800 Second Avenue, Suite 400G, New York, NY 10017
(212) 599-0950/0955

Samoa15-12-1976
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/samoa
800 Second Avenue, Suite 400J, New York, NY 10017
(212) 599-6196/6197

San Marino02-03-1992
N/A
327 East 50th Street, New York, NY 10022
(212) 751-1234

Sao Tome and Principe16-09-1975
N/A
400 Park Avenue, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10022
(212) 317 0644

Saudi Arabia 24-10-1945
www.saudimission.org
809 United Nations Plaza, 10th and 11th Floors, New York, NY 10017
(212) 557-1525

Senegal28-09-1960
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/senegal
238 East 68th Street, New York, NY 10065
(212) 517-9030/9031/9032

Serbia*01-11-2000
www.un.int/serbia/
854 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10021
(212) 879-8700

*The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was an original Member of the United Nations, the Charter having been signed on its behalf on 26 June 1945 and ratified 19 October 1945, until its dissolution following the establishment and subsequent admission as new Members of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republic of Croatia, the Republic of Slovenia, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
The Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/237 of 22 May 1992.
The Republic of Croatia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/238 of 22 May 1992.
The Republic of Slovenia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/236 of 22 May 1992.
By resolution A/RES/47/225 of 8 April 1993, the General Assembly decided to admit as a Member of the United Nations the State being provisionally referred to for all purposes within the United Nations as "The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" pending settlement of the difference that had arisen over its name.
The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/55/12 of 1 November 2000.
On 4 February 2003, following the adoption and promulgation of the Constitutional Charter of Serbia and Montenegro by the Assembly of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the official name of " Federal Republic of Yugoslavia" was changed to Serbia and Montenegro.
In a letter dated 3 June 2006, the President of the Republic of Serbia informed the Secretary-General that the membership of Serbia and Montenegro was being continued by the Republic of Serbia, following Montenegro's declaration of independence.
Seychelles21-09-1976
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/seychelles
800 Second Avenue, Suite 400C, New York, NY 10017
(212) 972-1785

Sierra Leone27-09-1961
www.un.int/sierraleone/
245 East 49th Street, New York, NY 10017
(212) 688-1656/6748

Singapore*21-09-1965
www.mfa.gov.sg/newyork/
231 East 51st Street, New York, NY 10022
(212) 826-0840/0841/0842/0843/0844

*The Federation of Malaya joined the United Nations on 17 September 1957.
On 16 September 1963, its name was changed to Malaysia, following the admission to the new federation of Singapore, Sabah (North Borneo) and Sarawak.
Singapore became an independent State on 9 August 1965 and a Member of the United Nations on 21 September 1965.

Slovakia*19-01-1993
www.unnewyork.mfa.sk/App/WCM/ZU/...
801 Second Avenue, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 286-8880

*Czechoslovakia was an original Member of the United Nations from 24 October 1945.
In a letter dated 10 December 1992, its Permanent Representative informed the Secretary-General that the Czech and Slovak Federal Republic would cease to exist on 31 December 1992 and that the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic, as successor States, would apply for membership in the United Nations.
Following the receipt of their application, the Security Council, on 8 January 1993, recommended to the General Assembly that the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic be both admitted to United Nations membership. Both the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic were thus admitted on 19 January of that year as Member States.
Slovenia*22-05-1992
www.un.int/slovenia/
600 Third Avenue, 24th Floor New York, N.Y. 10016
(212) 370-3007

*The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was an original Member of the United Nations, the Charter having been signed on its behalf on 26 June 1945 and ratified 19 October 1945, until its dissolution following the establishment and subsequent admission as new Members of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republic of Croatia, the Republic of Slovenia, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
The Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/237 of 22 May 1992.
The Republic of Croatia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/238 of 22 May 1992.
The Republic of Slovenia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/236 of 22 May 1992.
By resolution A/RES/47/225 of 8 April 1993, the General Assembly decided to admit as a Member of the United Nations the State being provisionally referred to for all purposes within the United Nations as "The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" pending settlement of the difference that had arisen over its name.
The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/55/12 of 1 November 2000.
On 4 February 2003, following the adoption and promulgation of the Constitutional Charter of Serbia and Montenegro by the Assembly of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the official name of " Federal Republic of Yugoslavia" was changed to Serbia and Montenegro.
In a letter dated 3 June 2006, the President of the Republic of Serbia informed the Secretary-General that the membership of Serbia and Montenegro was being continued by the Republic of Serbia, following Montenegro's declaration of independence.
Montenegro held a 21 May 2006 referendum and declared itself independent from Serbia on 3 June.
On 28 June 2006 it was accepted as a United Nations Member State by General Assembly resolution A/RES/60/264.

Soloman Islands19-09-1978
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/solomonislands
800 Second Avenue, Suite 400L New York, N.Y. 10017-4709
(212) 599-6192/6193

Somalia20-09-1960
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/somalia/
425 East 61st Street, Suite 702, New York, NY 10021
(212) 688-9410/5046

South Africa07-11-1945
www.southafrica-newyork.net/
333 East 38th Street, 9th Floor, New York, NY 10016
(212) 213-5583

South Sudan*14-07-2011
N/A
N/A
N/A

*The Republic of South Sudan formally seceded from Sudan on 9 July 2011 as a result of an internationally monitored referendum held in January 2011, and ‎was admitted as a new Member State ‎by the United Nations General Assembly on 14 ‎July 2011.
Spain14-12-1955
http://www.spainun.org
245 East 47th Street, 36th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 661-1050

Sri Lanka14-12-1955
www.slmission.com/
630 Third Avenue, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 986-7040/7041/7042/7043

Sudan12-11-1956
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/sudan
305 East 47th Street, 3 Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza, 4th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 573-6033

Suriname04-12-1975
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/suriname
866 United Nations Plaza, Suite 320, New York, NY 10017-1822
(212) 826-0660/0661/0662/0663

Swaziland24-09-1968
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/swaziland
408 East 50th Street, New York, NY 10022
(212) 371-8910

Sweden19-11-1946
www.swedenabroad.com/...
885 Second Avenue, 46th Floor, New York, NY 10017-2201
(212) 583-2500

Switzerland10-09-2002
www.eda.admin.ch/missny
633 Third Avenue, 29th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 286-1540

Syrian Arab Republic*24-10-1945
www.un.int/syria/
820 Second Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 661-1313

*Egypt and Syria were original Members of the United Nations from 24 October 1945.
Following a plebiscite on 21 February 1958, the United Arab Republic was established by a union of Egypt and Syria and continued as a single Member.
On 13 October 1961, Syria, having resumed its status as an independent State, resumed its separate membership in the United Nations.
On 2 September 1971, the United Arab Republic changed its name to the Arab Republic of Egypt.
T

Tajikistan02-03-1992
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/tajikistan
216 East 49th Street, 5th Floor, New York, N.Y. 10017
(212) 207-3315

Thailand16-12-1946
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/thailand
351 East 52nd Street, New York, NY 10022
(212) 754-2230

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia *08-04-1993
www.macedonia-un.org/
866 United Nations Plaza, Suite 517, New York, NY 10017
(212) 308-8504/8723

*The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was an original Member of the United Nations, the Charter having been signed on its behalf on 26 June 1945 and ratified 19 October 1945, until its dissolution following the establishment and subsequent admission as new Members of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Republic of Croatia, the Republic of Slovenia, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.
The Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/237 of 22 May 1992.
The Republic of Croatia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/238 of 22 May 1992.
The Republic of Slovenia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/46/236 of 22 May 1992.
By resolution A/RES/47/225 of 8 April 1993, the General Assembly decided to admit as a Member of the United Nations the State being provisionally referred to for all purposes within the United Nations as "The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia" pending settlement of the difference that had arisen over its name.
The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was admitted as a Member of the United Nations by General Assembly resolution A/RES/55/12 of 1 November 2000.
On 4 February 2003, following the adoption and promulgation of the Constitutional Charter of Serbia and Montenegro by the Assembly of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the official name of " Federal Republic of Yugoslavia" was changed to Serbia and Montenegro.
In a letter dated 3 June 2006, the President of the Republic of Serbia informed the Secretary-General that the membership of Serbia and Montenegro was being continued by the Republic of Serbia, following Montenegro's declaration of independence.
Montenegro held a 21 May 2006 referendum and declared itself independent from Serbia on 3 June.
On 28 June 2006 it was accepted as a United Nations Member State by General Assembly resolution A/RES/60/264.
Timor-Leste27-09-2002
N/A
866 United Nations Plaza, Suite 441, New York, NY 10017
(212) 759-3675

Togo20-09-1960
www.mistg-un.org/
112 East 40th Street, New York, NY 10016
(212) 490-3455/3456

Tonga14-09-1999
www.un.int/tonga/
250 East 51st Street, New York, NY 10022
(917) 369-1025

Trinidad and Tobago18-09-1962
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/trinidadandtobago
122 East 42nd Street, 39th Floor New York, N.Y. 10168
(212) 697-7620/7621/7622/7623

Tunisia12-11-1956
NA
31 Beekman Place, New York, NY 10022
(212) 751-7503/7534/5069

Turkey24-10-1945
www.un.int/turkey/
821 United Nations Plaza, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 949-0150

Turkmenistan02-03-1992
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/turkmenistan
866 United Nations Plaza, Suite 424, New York, NY 10017
(212) 486-8908

Tuvalu05-09-2000
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/tuvalu
800 Second Avenue, Suite 400D, New York, NY 10017
(212) 490-0534

U

Uganda25-10-1962
www.ugandamissionunny.net/
336 East 45th Street, New York, NY 10017
(212) 949-0110/0111/0112/0113

Ukraine24-10-1945
www.mfa.gov.ua/uno
220 East 51st Street, New York, NY 10022
(212) 759-7003

United Arab Emirates09-12-1971
www.un.int/uae/
305 East 47th Street, 7th Floor New York, N.Y. 10017
(212) 371-0480

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland24-10-1945
ukun.fco.gov.uk/en/
885 Second Avenue New York, N.Y. 10017
(212) 745-9200

United Republic of Tanzania* 14-12-1961
www.tanzania-un.org/
201 East 42nd Street, Suite 1700, New York, NY 10017
(212) 972-9160

*Tanganyika was a Member of the United Nations from 14 December 1961 and Zanzibar was a Member from 16 December 1963.
Following the ratification on 26 April 1964 of Articles of Union between Tanganyika and Zanzibar, the United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar continued as a single Member, changing its name to the United Republic of Tanzania on 1 November 1964.
United States of America24-10-1945
www.usunnewyork.usmission.gov/
140 East 45th Street, New York, NY 10017
(212) 415-4000

Uruguay18-12-1945
www.un.int/uruguay/
866 United Nations Plaza, Suite 322, New York, NY 10017
(212) 752-8240

Uzbekistan02-03-1992
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/uzbekistan
801 Second Avenue, 20th Floor, New York, NY 10017
(212) 486-4242

V
Vanuatu15-09-1981
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/vanuatu
800 Second Avenue, Suite 400B, New York, NY 10017
(212) 661-4303
Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)15-11-1945
www.venezuelaonu.gob.ve/
335 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017
(212) 557-2055
VietNam20-09-1977
www.vietnam-un.org/en/index.php
866 United Nations Plaza, Suite 435, New York, NY 10017
(212) 644-0594/0831/1564

Y
Yemen*30-09-1947
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/yemen
413 East 51st Street, New York, NY 10022
(212) 355-1730/1731
*Yemen was admitted to membership in the United Nations on 30 September 1947 and Democratic Yemen on 14 December 1967.
On 22 May 1990, the two countries merged and have since been represented as one Member with the name "Yemen".
Z
Zambia01-12-1964
www.un.int/zambia/
237 East 52nd Street, New York, NY 10022
(212) 888-5770

Zimbabwe25-08-1980
www.un.int/wcm/content/site/zimbabwe
128 East 56th Street, New York, NY 10022
(212) 980-9511/5084

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